Water Conservation

Water Quality

Bear Creek Watershed

  

Bear Creek Water and Sanitation District to Add Water Surcharge to
Denver Water Billing Beginning on January 1, 2018

Bear Creek Water and Sanitation District is a water distributor of Denver Water under a Read and Bill Service Agreement.  In the past, the District has received no income from water sales to contribute towards the Operations and Maintenance of the water lines owned by the District. 

A Rates Study was performed in 2017 by Raftelis Financial Consultants.  As a result of the Rates Study, the consultants recommended that the District add a water surcharge to the Denver Water billing in order to pay for capital improvement projects and the operations and maintenance of the water system which is owned by the District.

On November 13, 2017, the Bear Creek Water and Sanitation District Board of Directors voted unanimously to add a $6.00 per single family residential equivalent (SFRE) water surcharge to the Denver Water monthly billing beginning on January 1, 2018

An Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) was signed with Denver Water to collect the surcharge on behalf of Bear Creek Water and Sanitation District.  This IGA was approved on December 13, 2017 by the Denver Board of Water Commissioners.

If you have any questions regarding the surcharge, plese contact the District office at 303-986-3442 or bearcreekwater@bearcreekwater.org


2018 Residential Rates: Outside City — Read & Bill

Monthly Fixed Charges, $ per Bill

Meter Size (inches)Monthly Charge
5⁄8″ & 3⁄4″ $15.39
1″ $21.44
1 1⁄2″ $40.16
2″ $66.14
3″ $139.84
4″ $243.14
6″ $539.15
8″ $952.97
10″ $1,485.18
12″ $2,136.45

Treated Water Volume Rates, $ per 1,000 gallons

Single-Family Residential Customers

TierMonthly consumption (gallons)Rate per 1,000 gallons
Tier 1 0 to average winter consumption (AWC) — see Note 3 $2.52
Tier 2 AWC + 15,000 $4.54
Tier 3 Greater than AWC + 15,000 $6.05

2018 Business Treated Water Rates: Outside City — Read & Bill

Monthly Fixed Charges, $ per Bill

Meter Size (inches)Monthly Charge
5⁄8″ & 3⁄4″ $15.39
1″ $21.44
1 1⁄2″ $40.16
2″ $66.14
3″ $139.84
4″ $243.14
6″ $539.15
8″ $952.97
10″ $1,485.18
12″ $2,136.45

Treated Water Volume Rates, $ per 1,000 gallons

Nonresidential Customers

TierMonthly consumption (gallons)Rate per 1,000 gallons
Tier 1 0 to average winter consumption (AWC) — see Notes 3 and 4 $3.12
Tier 2 AWC to 4 × AWC $4.37
Tier 3 Greater than 4 × AWC $4.99

Irrigation Only Customers

 Rate per 1,000 gallons
Winter (Nov. 1 through April 30) $1.42
Summer (May 1 through October 31) $5.68

Private Fireline

Fireline Size (inches)Monthly Charge
1″ $2.55
2″ $4.26
4″ $6.58
6″ $9.41
8″ $16.46
10″ $23.51
12″ $37.62
16″ $94.06
   
Fire Hydrants $9.41

While the District owns and maintains the public water distribution system, water services are provided by Denver Water under a water service agreement, which includes the reading of meters and billing based upon water consumption. 
 

 PDF document Lead Plumbing Awareness brochure 

Direct Website Address for brochure: http://www.denverwater.org/docs/assets/05529236-98D1-5338-EF3EFCB2C101E557/LeadBrochure.pdf

Call Denver Water at 303-893-2444 for more information.

Lead_tap_water

The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) at http://www.epa.gov/lead/ has determined that lead can cause health problems if it accumulates in your body.

The most common source of lead is from paint in homes and buildings built before 1978. Lead can also present a health concern if it is present in drinking water. The most common source of lead in drinking water comes after the main, in customers' plumbing, particularly lead service lines.  Lead can get into the water if a customer's lead service line is disturbed, or if a customer has older plumbing fixtures in the home that contain lead.  Denver Water's testing shows that most lead service lines are not creating a water-quality risk, but we encourage customers who have lead service lines to get a water-quality test and consider replacing the line. The customer owns the entire service line, from the main to inside the home.

Each year Denver Water collects more than 10,000 water samples and runs nearly 50,000 water quality tests, including tests for lead.

No sites have been identified in the Bear Creek Water and Sanitation District water service area.

 

 

 


 

Spring weather brings out impersonators

Denver Water does not conduct random water pressure or quality checks

               

May 5, 2011:

 

Denver Water is issuing a reminder to customers not to allow people claiming to be water department employees or contractors working for the water department to enter their homes without proper identification.

 

The utility has a lot of projects going on in the spring and summer, and in the past, persons claiming to be water department employees have gained access to customers’ homes on the pretext of checking for water pressure or water quality, for example. Then, they go through the homes looking for cash or valuables. Some have asked for money from customers.

 

Denver Water does not conduct random water pressure or quality checks. The utility also wants customers to know that employees do not collect money on site.

 

All Denver Water employees carry photo-identification cards. Service personnel wear shirts, jackets or caps, and drive vehicles clearly marked with Denver Water’s logo. The utility’s “Water Savers” who enforce watering rules are in bright orange and white cars or bicycles and also carry photo-identification cards.

 

Customers who are approached by con artists should call the police and Denver Water Customer Care at 303-893-2444.

 

 

Denver Water proudly serves high-quality water and promotes its efficient use to 1.3 million people in the city of Denver and many surrounding suburbs. Established in 1918, the utility is a public agency funded by water rates, new tap fees and the sale of hydropower, not taxes. It is Colorado's oldest and largest water utility.


As a Distributor for Denver Water, Bear Creek Water and Sanitation District enforces the watering restrictions as adopted by the Denver Water Board of Water Commissioners. Beginning May 1, 2011 you may water three days a week but not between the hours of 10:00 a.m and 6:00 p.m. For more information on this or any other Denver Water topic, please visit Denver Water at: www.denverwater.org


 

CWCB is proud to partner with the Governor’s Energy Office in offering Coloradans an unprecedented tool for energy efficiency and cost savings. On April 19, the Governor’s Energy Office will launch a new and comprehensive website, www.rechargecolorado.com, including home appliance, (clothes washer & dish washer) rebates to offer Coloradans an unprecedented tool to save money and embrace Colorado’s New Energy Economy.

 

The new site, as well as a call center (1.800.462.0184), will offer comprehensive and localized information about rebates and financial incentives, service providers, conservation and money-saving tips, and energy news from across the state, as well as personalized tools and planners—all of which can have tremendous impact on your water and energy use and cost-savings.

 

Visit www.RechargeColorado.org  beginning April 19 to learn about the rebate program, and please check the website regularly and often for news, information and updates about the program.